vpnsTag Archives

VPN Services Purged by Chinese

China is blocking VPN services that let users evade on-line censorship of popular sites such as Facebook and Google amid a broader crack down on on-line advice, specialists and technology businesses said.

The virtual private network supplier Golden Frog wrote on its website the managements have hit a broad swath of VPN services. The favorite supplier Astrill told its users that its VPN protocols for Apple cellular devices to access services like Gmail have been blocked.   It’s been happening for years, but in some instances the Chinese have turned a blind eye to many of these services particularly the basic ones.  But last year there was a significant escalation with even the onion-routed service, TOR being targeted with specific nodes being blocked and also the commercial Smart DNS services like this.

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The Chinese government blocks tens of thousands of sites to prevent from reaching Chinese users what it deems politically sensitive info. VPNs reroute and encrypt Internet traffic in order that censors can not tell what is being obtained.

“This week’s assault on VPNs that changed its citizens and other VPN suppliers is more complex than that which we have found previously.”

For controlling the Internet, the Chinese government’s bureau didn’t promptly react to questions.

China-based entrepreneur Richard Robinson said the managements have especially hurt small- and medium-sized foreign businesses that depend on VPNs. Many bigger businesses can afford direct connections to servers outside the state, he said.

Over the previous weeks, Chinese censors have blocked what staying access there’s to Gmail and other Google products. Google services limited or have been occasionally blocked since 2010 when the firm said it would no longer collaborate with the censors in China.

“These smaller companies, they are dependent on Gmail,” Robinson said.

“That to me is a really definitely associated fact together with the quantity of political gossips and data related to China’s high politics showing up in sites beyond China.”

Additional Resources

http://thenewproxies.com/british-ip-address/

http://www.anonymous-proxies.org/

Internet Discrimination – A Real Issue

When the internet first came along, it was pretty wild, disorganized and often very hard to find stuff you were looking for.   The search engines were in their infancy, sometimes they’d help you find the information you were looking for but more often than not would propel you into completely random unrelated areas.

It was fascinating and exciting, probably largely because the concept was new and amazing.   I remember well having a chat with a welder from Houston in Texas about computers, using a very simple IRC client (Internet Relay Chat).  The concept was incredible, that my words were being transported down my telephone wires and almost instantly being read by a bloke called Alan sitting across the Atlantic.  Of course our children take all this for granted, and in some senses it’s kind of sad that  they missed out on that ‘moment of realization’ which many of us remember vividly.

Now my children have as many digital friends across the globe as they do in their local town.  It’s simply commonplace to communicate with people across the globe using a host of digital devices.   Search engines are increasingly efficient and usually home in on the information you need with minimal fuss, albeit with a growing sense of commercialism.

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However not all aspects of the internet have improved, and one of the most worrying trends is the growing level of filtering and censoring that is occurring.   In the first few years of the internet, it was virtually irrelevant  where you were located, we were all simply internet users.  I could see exactly the same from the UK as if I had logged in from Thailand, USA, China or Japan.  This is far from true nowadays where for a variety of reasons, the internet can look very different depending on where you log in from.

Blocks, filters and discrimination are common place – sometimes based on commercial reasons – others based on Government control.    The result is that your experience of the internet is greatly influenced by your physical location.  Do you want to watch all the latest movies on a the website Netflix, well you’ll need more than a subscription to the media giant – you’ll need to be in the USA.

Of course, the anarchic elements of the internet are constantly working hard to provide ways to work around these filters. You can use an American DNS for Netflix and fool it’s redirection, you can connect through a secure proxy to side step Government black lists.  It takes a little effort and some expenditure, but the unfettered version of the internet is still available if you try.  The problem is that for many even the inexpensive tools are out of reach, so for some living in places like China or Iran,  what you see online will be controlled by your Government.

It’s sad certainly that something that was once accessible to all, without distinction or discrimination is becoming like the rest of the world.   Slowly but surely tiers of internet access are  being established, due to blocks, filters and even access to infrastructure.  I might feel happy that I can use a VPN client and watch Channel 4 Online when I’m on holiday in Spain, but the reality is that it’s only available because I have the disposable income to buy  these tools.